MIDDLE KINGDOM
LETTER OF ACCEPTANCES AND RETURNS

FEBRUARY 2002


This is the Middle Kingdom Letter of Acceptances and Returns for the December 2001 letters of Escutcheon and Keythong. Comments in braces {} were removed from the Letter of Intent sent to Laurel and the College of Arms. Names, devices, or badges in braces have been returned or pended; general comments or replies to commentary are also placed in braces. Thanks to Cnut, Julie Stampnitzky, Mihál Krÿstÿna, Rory mac Feidhlimidh, Mikhail of Lubelska, Ælfreda æt Æthelwealda, and Anne Aliz du Bazle (Fretty) with Cathyn Fitzgerald, Alia Marie de Blois, and Pendar Rampart, from the Outlands, for their commentary this month.





1) Æsa in bjardúlska - New name & device

Argent, on a chevron vert between two fir trees proper and a bear's head couped close vert, langued gules, three crosses potent argent.

<Æsa> is found in Geirr Bassi, and also at http://www.sit.wisc.edu/ ~sfriedemann/names/landnamabok.htm. <in bjardúlski> is a constructed byname, intended to mean "woman from Bear-Dale." Geirr Bassi lists as bynames <bjarki> meaning "bear-cub," <Bjarneyja> meaning "Bear Island," and <inn haukdúlski> meaning "man from Hawk-Dale." <in bjardúlska> appears to be a reasonable construction meaning "woman from Bear-Dale"; <in> is the feminine form of the article and <-ska> the appropriate feminine form of <-ski>. The submitter wants a feminine name and is most interested in having an authentic Norse name.



Name commentary

Krÿstÿna: I don't know enough Old Norse to be able to judge if the surname is correctly formed. I would have liked to see more documentation as to the form used. I believe there are people at the Laurel level that would be capable of judging the form of the surname.



Device commentary





2) Christian de Xavier - Device resubmission

Per pale azure and gules, three fleurs-de-lys argent

Name reg. 10/01

Unfortunately, this conflicts with the device of Caterine d'Albret "Per pale vert and purpure, three fleurs-de-lys argent," on the Outlands 12/17/01 ELoI. I have contacted Caterine about permission to conflict, and she has politely declined. However, since, as of this writing, Caterine's device is not yet registered, I can't return Christian's for conflict. Maybe "Per pale azure and gules, six fleurs-de-lys argent" will be clear when he resubmits.



Device commentary





3) Gabriel de Lanzarote - New name & new device

Counter-ermine, a fox couchant guardant within a bordure argent.

The client cites a web page (http://olivetreegenealogy.com/ships/ Columbus_dead.html) which references one <Gabriel Baraona of Belmonte> who died in Hispaniola after being left there on Columbus's 1492 voyage. <Gabriel> is also found in "16th Century Spanish Men's Names" by Elspeth Anne Roth (http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~kvs/mnames.html). <Lanzarote> is one of the Canary islands, which got its name from Lacilotto Malozelo who did commerce with the island in the 13th century, and for whom the island was named. The client wants a masculine name, cares most about sound and wants a Spanish name that would date anywhere from 1325-1575. The client notes that he would be willing to drop the preposition <de>, but since <de> is needed in a locative byname such as this, it should not be dropped.



Name commentary

Krÿstÿna: I have no problems with Gabriel. It is a fine period Spanish name. I could not corroborate the history of Lanzarote. I only did a quick web search, however. As he seems to mean that the surname is to be a locative, I do not recommend removal of the "de."



Device commentary





{*) Hroar Stormgengr - New name & device

Gules, on a bend sinister Or three balusters palewise, overall a laurel wreath vert

<Hróarr> is found in Geirr Bassi, as is the preposed byname <Go,ngu-> or <Göngu->, meaning "Walk-." However, no evidence was provided for the element <storm>, nor any for the construction "storm-walker," and none could be found. <Go,ngu-Hróarr> would be a fine name, meaning "Walk-Hróarr" or "Hróarr who walks," but this is too great a change to make without the client's permission, so we are returning this submission.

The device is being returned for a number of problems, most specifically that laurel wreaths are reserved charges and can only be used in Society branch arms. [Note: Paul's statement in the LoI about them being allowed for royal peers is incorrect. Royal peers are also not allowed to use laurel wreaths in their armory.] Secondly is a problem of contrast: By RfS VIII.2.b.i Contrast Requirements, overall charges must have good contrast with the field, not with the charge they overly. Vert does not have good contrast with gules. Thirdly, balusters have never been registered before in the Society. Before they could be, documentation that they are appropriate heraldic charges would be required. Additionally, though not a cause for return, it should be noted in the blazon that the balusters are palewise.

Unfortunately, simply removing the laurel wreath will cause a conflict; Sebastian of Ventbarré bears "Gules, on a bend sinister Or, three wings palewise, each terminating in a hand brandishing a sword sable." Without the laurel wreath, there is one CD for the changes of type and tincture of the tertiaries.}

Name commentary

Julie: "Storm walker" or "walking storm" does not seem like a reasonable byname.



Rory: As stated by Escutcheon, the byname elements are not supported by Geirr Bassi. Hróarr is in Geirr Bassi, and would be a change in spelling of the submitted personal name. But without some documentation

and/or support for the byname, it may not be registerable.



Æ&M: Name: "Storm" is found in the OED, and in combination forms as well. The closest combination words we could find are listed below. From the Online Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edition Under Storm, n. III, attributed and combination forms:



b) instrumental

1591 SYLVESTER Ivry 174 *Storm-arm'd Auster cruell.



c) objective

1552 HULOET, *Storme brynger,..nimbifer. 1582 STANYHURST Æneis I. (Arb.) 35 But with a flaw suddeyn chauffing stormbringer, Orion, Spurnt vs too the waters.



Fretty: We concur with Escutcheon that the documentation submitted for this name, both first name and byname, is insufficient. Sadly, we do not have the books on hand to attempt to document this properly.



Device commentary

Cnut: In addition to the laurel wreath problems, which also include a tincture violation, the balusters need to be blazoned as palewise. Also, since they haven't been used as charges before, they should be documented or reblazoned as ewers.



Simply removing the wreath conflicts with: Sebastian of Ventbarré, September of 1992 (via the West): Gules, on a bend sinister Or, three wings palewise, each terminating in a hand brandishing a sword sable.



Julie: The laurel wreath is color-on-color. Overall charges must have good contrast with the field.



Rory: RfS XI.1 Presumptuous Armory clearly states "...individuals may not place laurel wreaths on their armory..." The Administrative Handbook, Table 1, Reserved Charges reserves the usage of laurel wreaths only to Society branch arms. As Master Hroar is not a Society branch, he can not put a laurel wreath on his arms.



[Additional note - the ILoI is incorrect - laurel wreaths may not be used by royal peers. By the Admin Handbook table cited above, Royal Peers are entitled to place the appropriate coronet on their arms, but not a laurel wreath.]



Æ&M: Yes, the laurel wreath must be removed. However, simply removing it leads to a conflict, with only 1 CD for change to the tertiaries: Sebastian of Ventbarré The following device associated with this name was registered in September of 1992 (via the West): Gules, on a bend sinister Or, three wings palewise, each terminating in a hand brandishing a sword sable.



Fretty: As for the device, this is clearly a case for return, as we do not permit individuals to register laurel wreaths, members of the Order of the Laurel or no. In addition, the vert laurel wreath over the gules field is color on color. Also to be considered before resubmission, none of the heralds present knew offhand what a baluster was, nor could it be found in our copy of the PicDic, or in a quick search of the O&A. If this is a first-time registration of this charge, it too will need some documentation.





{*) Justinos Tekton - New name & device

Gules, on a bezant a fleam sable, on a chief dovetailed Or, two keys fesswise reversed sable

<Justin> or <Iustinos> was the name of two emperors of Byzantium, according to The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium p. 1082. <Tekton> is Greek for "carpenter" according to ibid p. 382, but this source gives no indication whether this is a modern Greek word, or if it would be an appropriate medieval Byzantine byname. Sandoval's The Directory of Saints p. 177 also mentions that a martyr in the second century named <Justin>. The client would prefer Justinos, but will accept Iustinos. He cares most about language and secondly about meaning ("Justin the carpenter") and would like an authentic Byzantine name.

This name is being pended to contact the submitter about the byname; as presented, the evidence for <Tekton> is rather slim. If the client would truly like an authentic Byzantine name meaning "Justinos the carpenter," there is an alternative we can offer: The byname <Pelekanos> "carpenter" is found in 14th century Byzantine Macedonian records published in Peasant Society in the Late Byzantine Empire by Angeliki E. Laiou-Thomadakis. Changing <Tekton> to <Pelekanos> is in keeping with the submitter's desires, but is too big a change for me to feel comfortable making without permission.

The device is being pended along with the name; it has no problems as is.}



Name commentary

Fretty: This name seems acceptable, given the documentation.



Device commentary

Fretty: The device approaches being too complex, but it should be acceptable. We were not able to find any conflicts in the O&A.





{*) Justinos Tekton - New badge

[Fieldless] A cog wheel azure

This is being pended because the name was pended. There are no problems with it as is.}



Badge commentary

Rory: Very nice! Clean, simple, fieldless - a good badge!



Fretty: This badge ((Fieldless) a cog wheel azure) should have no problems. Wheels are wheels, but Alia Marie was unable to find any conflicts in the O&A or the letters since. Apparently blue wheels aren't that popular.





{*) Marie Boleyn - New device

Purpure, a dancer maiden Or, on a chief argent, a Dachshund proper

Name reg'd 11/98

This is being returned for a number of problems, including redrawing. Firstly, there is no default coloration for Dachshunds. Precedent from Da'ud I states that "proper is allowed for natural flora and fauna where there is a widely understood default coloration for the charge so specified." Dachshunds do not have a standard coloration, and the dog on this device is of an indeterminate color. In resubmitting, please pick a heraldic tincture for the dog.

Secondly, "dancer maiden" is not sufficiently descriptive of the primary charge, which is also not in any standard heraldic posture. While humanoid figures are found in armory, the only thing found similar to this is a single instance of a human charge blazoned as a "dancer" found in Von Volborth's Heraldry: Custom, Rule, and Styles (p. 193). Unfortunately, I do not have a copy of this, so I do not know how similar a charge it is to the submitted arms.

Lastly, the chief needs to be wider, and the dog should not be standing on the line of division.}

Device commentary

Cnut: Purpure, a maiden vested as a middle eastern dancer Or, on a chief argent, a dachshund ???.



The period colour of the dachshund was similar to the modern "red" coloured animal. (IoL, 31 Jan 73 [59], p. 4) Precedents - Early Years under Dachshund



"PRECEDENT: The College of Arms will no longer register flora and fauna in their natural 'proper' tinctures if to do so they require the Linnaean genus and species. Proper is allowed for natural flora and fauna where there is a widely understood default coloration for the charge so specified. My rule of thumb here is that if you have to look it up in a book, it is excessive. An elephant 'proper' most everyone knows - it's basically gray, as is a natural dolphin proper. A brown bear proper or a brown horse proper, no problem. Natural tigers, trees, zebras, bald eagles, blackberry vines, and such-like may be registered as 'proper'. Loard Black Boar (Atenveldt), Phillip of Loch Shelldrake, suggests a similar rule of thumb: one adjective to describe the proper charge is fine (a Bengal tiger proper, a brown bear proper), but 'a blazon of several adjectives should be given the heraldic hairy eyeball'." (CL 5/13 p.2). Precedents Da'ud 1.1 under proper



This was submitted as a "red roan pegasus proper," which lies within the bounds of heraldic gules. [BoE, 14 Jul 85, p.4] [It was registered as a "pegasus gules".] Precedents - Baldwin under proper



Can a dachshund be a proper proper?



There is a wide variation of coloring in the modern breed from argent marked to sable. (Dachshund Club of America Web Site [http://www.dachshund-dca.org/Colors.html]) This violates the widely understood default clause of Da'ud's precedent. The "proper" in Iosef's precedent gets reblazoned to gules by Baldwin's precedent. Reblazon in acceptable heraldic tincture if emblazon allows, otherwise return.



The emblazon shown isn't an unshaded b&w drawing.



Draw the chief a little wider.



Clear, but return for various problems.



Rory: There is no default "proper" for a dog - dachshunds can be light brown, dark brown, white, black, or any combination of the above. I also agree with Escutcheon that the "maiden" needs better blazoning.



Æ&M: Modern dachsunds can come in several coat colors. If the dachshund was present in several coat colors in period as well, then the type of "proper" may need to be specified.



Taken from the Color FAQ at the Dachsund Club of America Website www.dachshund-dca.org/ Color.Pattern_FAQ.html



What Color or Pattern is that Dachshund???

1. What is a pattern? How is it different than a color?



The self, or solid, colors in dachshunds are red, cream, black and tan, black and cream, chocolate and tan, blue and tan, and isabella (fawn) and tan. All dachshunds have one, and only one, self color.



The patterns found in dachshunds are dapple, double dapple, brindle, sable, and piebald. Any pattern can be superimposed over any self, or solid, color; for instance, black and tan dapple, red brindle, chocolate and tan piebald. The color is named first, followed by the pattern, if any.



From the Encyclopedia Britannica Online



(German: "badger dog"), dog breed of hound and terrier ancestry developed in Germany to pursue badgers into their burrows. The dachshund is a long-bodied, characteristically lively dog with a deep chest, short legs, tapering muzzle, and long ears. Usually reddish brown or black-and-tan, it is bred in two sizes--standard and miniature--and in three coat types--smooth, long, and wiry. The standard dachshund stands about 7 to 10 inches (18 to 25 centimetres) and weighs 16 to 32 pounds (7 to 14.5 kilograms); the miniature is shorter and weighs less than 9 pounds (4 kilograms).



To cite this page:

"dachshund" Encyclopædia Britannica Online.

<http://www.sear ch.eb.com/bol/topic?eu=28944&sctn=1&pm=1>



Encyclopedia Britannica table on "Selected Breeds of Hounds" states that the dachshund was developed

around the 1600s (no cite listed on page)



The female figure probably needs to be blazoned as a "Saracen maiden" (or some such), to point out the fact that she is wearing middle-eastern style pants.



Fretty: Fretty and Alia Marie both commented "Isn't Anne Boleyn's sister named Marie?" but since the name is already registered, it's a moot issue. Regarding the device (Purpure, a dancer maiden Or, on a chief argent, a daschund proper), Escutcheon suggested that the maiden might need further blazoning. Rampart, by phone, mentioned that he had a citation from _Heraldry: Custom, Rule, and Styles by Carl-Alexander von Volborth_ (p. 193) in which the human charge was blazoned as "a dancer." Rampart also suggested that, as long as the dancer was statant affronty, the positioning and clothing details would be artistic details, much like any other human used as a charge. In any case, the line drawing is insufficient to determine blazonable clothing details.



The dachshund is incorrectly drawn as standing on the line of division. Further, dogs do not have a "proper" coloring, so the tincture would need to be specified. A redraw seems in order.





4) Nikolas Grigorevich Petrov - New badge

Vert, in cross three mullets and a dragonfly Or

Name reg. 08/90

This badge is to be co-owned with Serena Kimbalwyke, name reg. 4/96



Badge commentary

Cnut: I am willing to accept his claim to be the same person. I have discussed the concept of not confusing the bureaucrats with him. The dragonfly should be drawn larger. Clear.



Rory: There is a Sir Nickolas Grigorevich Petrov listed on the Middle Kingdom Chivalry page, living in South Euclid, OH (mundane name Craig Israel). If the name matches, I think it is safe to think that this is the same person who's name was registered in 1990. (BTW, according to the *OLD* Admin. Handbook's list of Alternative Titles, "Ser" is a Russian alternative for "Sir". This may be why he styles himself this way. The *NEW* Handbook (which I'm in the middle of 'prettying up" for publication, does not list "Ser".).



Fretty: Escutcheon mentions difficulty with matching this submission with an appropriate name registration. Since the mullets are not really in chief, we would suggest a redraw, which might allow time for the name matching to be worked out. This badge is clear of Maol Anna de Chassant (4/94), Per fess sable and gules, a dragonfly Or, with 1 CD for the change to the field, and 1 CD for the addition of the secondary mullets. The device of Faoiltighearna ní Dhuinn (12/99), Vert, a dragonfly and on a chief Or three pomegranates gules slipped and leaved vert should be considered. There should be 1 CD for the chief vs. the mullets and 1 CD for the addition of the tertiary pomegranates. (Could be mistaken, tho.)





{*) Nonna Stormgengr - New name & device

Per bend sinister vert and azure, in bend sinister throughout a trident argent between two koi tergiant embowed in annulo gules, argent, sable, and azure

This name is being returned for lack of documentation. No evidence was provided for either element, and none could be found by the College. The client should be reminded that past registrations cannot be used as documentation for current registrations, especially registrations over 30 years old.

The device is being returned for a number of reasons. Firstly, koi have never been registered before, and before they can be registered, evidence must be presented both that koi were known to Western Europe before 1600 and that they would be appropriate heraldic charges. Barring such evidence, koi cannot be registered. Secondly, the fish are embowed, but tergiant embowed, and there is no evidence that tergiant is an appropriate posture for a fish. While it may be registerable, it is certainly a weirdness. Thirdly, there is no default coloration for koi, and as drawn in this device, there is no way to accurately blazon the distribution of the gules, argent, sable, and azure. Charges must be reproducible from the blazon alone, and so all charges need to be in a standard heraldic coloration. Finally, the fish, being mainly gules, sable, and azure, do not have good contrast the field, which is vert and azure.}



Name commentary

Rory: As with submission #1 above, the byname elements are not supported, and need better documentation before registration is possible.



Æ&M: Same comments as for #1



Fretty: This name suffers the exact same problem as #1, insufficient documentation.



Device commentary

Cnut: The fish are tergiant embowed, not the default profile depiction. First registration of koi - Please document:



From now on since there is no evidence that new world flora and fauna were used in period armory, while they will still be permitted, using them will now be considered a weirdness. (Abigail of Lough Derravara, 9/97 p. 8) Precedents Jaelle under Style-Weirdness



For purposes of registration, coastal sub-Saharan flora and fauna are considered the same as New World flora and fauna: they are a discouraged weirdness, but registerable. [Jamie Snawberd of Ross, 08/99, A-Caid] Precedents Elsbeth under Weirdness



Will this officially add Far Eastern Flora and Fauna to the Weirdness list?



Is tergiant an acceptable heraldic posture for fish? Although I couldn't find any applicable precedents, I think that, as it is a non-standard posture for fish, this depiction is one step from period practice and the second weirdness for this device.



Calico cats come in a variety of different patterns and color combinations so there is no way to accurately reproduce this emblazon. (Catherine of Gordonhall, 2/97 p. 19) Precedents - Jaelle under Blazonry



See also the Da'ud Precedent cited in item 4 [Marie] above.



According to the pictures at the Colorado Koi Website (http://www.coloradokoi.com/asagishu.htm), koi come in a variety of patterns and color combinations.



If this can't be blazoned in heraldic tinctures, Return.



Julie: The fish are seen from above (both eyes visible), which may not be a heraldic posture. If they are mostly color they have insufficient contrast with the field.



Æ&M: According to a history article I found, the "original" koi may have looked like the ones in this submission. However, modern koi come in many different colors and patterns.



Taken from "Koi History" at www.colaradokoi.com/koih.htm:

Some authorities believe Koi originated in Persia and spread throughout the ancient world. Koi, or nishikigoi - Japanese for "brocaded" carp - were fiirst described in writing from a Chinese book written during the Western Chin Dynasty, 265-316 A.D. At that time they were described as white, red, black and blue.



What happened to Koi from the 2nd to the 17th century is still being investigated, but many suspect Koi were gradually spread around the orient, and possibly even via trade caravans to or from the middle east.



Koi breeding in Japan is recorded from the 17th century in the rice-growing region of the Niigata Prefecture. They were originally bred as protein food supplements.



For modern koi, see www.coloradokoi.com/koivarie.htm



Fretty: The device suffers from several problems. First, the fish are (various) colors on color fields. Second, if the fish have this many colors, either they are "naturalistic" (a cause for return) or they are "proper." However, we suspect that koi do not have a "proper" color, and that they would instead be reblazoned as generic "fish" which definitely don't have a "proper" color. We did not particularly see the trident as being an issue, though we suspected it to be a way of separating the two colors of the field. We suggest a redraw/reblazon. We also suggest that the submitter consider changing the multicolored koi to "fish Or" which would fix the contrast and the blazonability issue. (Not to mention, look good.)





) Nonna Stormgengr for House Stormgengr - New house name & badge

[Fieldless] Or, a baluster reversed vert, on a bordure gules the words "Sporcus labor est sed alicumi faciendum est" sable, in base a Maltese cross sable.

This name is being returned for lack of documentation. No evidence was provided and none could be found for this being an appropriate household name.

The badge is being returned for a number of reasons. Firstly, balusters have never been registered before in the Society. Before they can be, documentation that they are appropriate heraldic charges is required. Secondly, the motto on the bordure was not translated; any writing on arms not in modern English must be translated so that the College knows what it says. It is not apparent that the motto here is even grammatically correct; one of the commenters familiar with Latin said she couldn't find <sporcus> or <alicumi> in their dictionary, and wondered if <spurcus> and <alicumi> were intended. Thirdly, the cross on the bordure is in an unblazonable position: "in base" isn't really something you can say about a charge on a bordure. It should be removed.

Name commentary

Rory: As with submission #1 above, the name elements are not supported, and need better documentation before registration is possible.



Æ&M: Same comments as #1.



Fretty: This name, of course, suffers the same flaws as #1 and #5.



Badge commentary

Cnut: "The handle (fr. corniere) should be sinister, and the lip dexter." (Parker 244, s.v. ewer) [BoE, 25 Aug 85, p.11] Precedents - Baldwin under Pitcher



See documentation comments for item 1 above.



This should be blazoned Or, a baluster contourney vert, on a bordure gules a motto: "Sporcus labor est sed alicui faciendum est."



Clear against ewer.



Julie: The motto is a tertiary charge on the bordure and needs a tincture. If it's black in the colored copy, this will be returned for color-on-color.



Do mottoes have to be documented? I can't find "sporcus" in my Latin dictionary; perhaps they meant "spurcus," '(morally) filthy.' The ordinary type of dirtiness is "sordidus." "Alicui faciendum est" [actually the emblazon seems to have "alicumi"] is "it must be done for/to someone." I suspect they wanted to say 'it must be done *by* someone,' "aliqu{o-) faciendus est."



Æ&M: The presence of the cross on the bordure needs to be blazoned, the "all capitals" font might need to be blazoned as well.



Fretty: The device (Or, a baluster vert, on a bordure gules a motto: "Sporcus labor est sed alicui faciendum est") suffers from one of the flaws of #1, the undocumented use of a baluster. In addition, we do not believe that the CoA registers mottos any more.





5) Sindri Jónsson - New name & device

Per chevron enarched throughout purpure and Or, two daggers Or and a bickern sable

Both <Sindri> and <Jón> are found in Geirr Bassi. We are not sure what the patronym formed from a name ending in a single <-n> is, but believe that <Jónsson> is appropriate. Submitted as <Sindri Jonsson>, we have corrected the patronym by adding the accent, as found in the documentation.



Name commentary

Krÿstÿna: Lovely and unusual first name. As for the surname, I am not sure if that is the proper formation. Moraig Drummond states in her letter that the form is to be found in Geirr-Bassi, but I could not find any information for the formation of a name simply ending in -n as the name Jon does. There is an entry for -nn on page 12, but I don't know that -n names are formed in the same way.



Device commentary





6) Undewyn de Maccuswell - New badge

Per bend sinister wavy azure and Or, in dexter chief two compass stars elongated to base and in sinister base a single-masted caravel counterchanged

Name reg'd 11/96

{This does not conflict with Aleksandra Alekseeva (reg. 2/96 via the East), "Per chevron gules and sable, two mullets of six points and a galleon Or." There is one CD for the field, and one for arrangement of the charges; the arrangement in Undewyn's badge is not forced, as they could have been two and one just as easily. This also does not conflict with Jamal ibn Saleem ibn Abdullah (reg 11/93 via Atenveldt), "Per chevron sable and azure, two mullets of nine points and a sword inverted Or." There is a CD for the field, and also one for arrangement.}



Badge commentary

Knute: Half. For the purposes of counting armorial difference, "half" is usually defined in the mathematical sense. However, in certain circumstances, "half" may be defined differently. These circumstances are:



(i) The bottommost of three charges arranged two and one, either alone on the field or surrounding a central ordinary such as a fess or chevron, is defined as one-half of that charge group. However, no more than one difference may be obtained by making changes to that bottommost charge. Glossary of Terms.



[mullets of six points vs compass stars] Current policy is to not grant different between mullets of six or more points... [Martin Diaz, 08/00, R-East] Precedents Elsbeth under COMPASS STAR and SUN



Aleksandra Alekseeva February of 1996 (via the East): Per chevron gules and sable, two mullets of six points and a galleon Or.



CD for field. The arrangement is a forced change, no CD. No CD for tincture change of 1/3 of group in this arrangement.



Jamal ibn Saleem ibn Abdullah November of 1993 (via Atenveldt): Per chevron sable and azure, two mullets of nine points and a sword inverted Or.



CD for field. The arrangement is a forced change, no CD. No CD for type or tincture change of 1/3 of group in this arrangement.



Under current rules and precedents this has two conflicts.



This submission is in it's default arrangement. There would be no conflicts if it's field was per chevron, which would actually increase the visual similarity with the cited conflicts.



Should the caravel be considered to be 1/2 of the primary group as it's visual impact is increased by being alone on it's half of the divided field?



Two charges is better style on this field but the question would still apply to a per pall or per chevron inverted field where three charges, one and two is the most balanced arrangement.



Julie: The arrangement should be specified: "in dexter chief two stars etc. in bend sinister and in sinister base a caravel etc."



Fretty: This badge should be clear of Philip Sinclair (12/97), Per bend sinister azure and argent, a mullet of four points and a lymphad counterchanged, with CDs for the complex line, the change to half the field, changing the number of stars, and possibly the difference between a 4-pointed mullet and a compass star.



We had some discussion of whether the compass stars should be blazoned as "in bend," but the consensus was that they were drawn to fill the available space, and that they would not need to be explicitly blazoned.





{*) Undewyn de Maccuswell - New badge

[Fieldless] A single-masted caravel azure, the sail charged with a compass star elongated to base Or

Name reg'd 11/96

This badge is being returned for violating long-standing precedent against charged sails on ships; all examples of charged sails in period were displays of badges or arms of another person, making them equivalent to arms of pretense, which are forbidden for Society usage. In this case, the arms born on the sail are the arms of Paul of Sunriver (reg 08/82 via the West), "Azure, a compass star Or."

"[Fieldless] A single-masted caravel azure" looks clear from conflict.}

Badge commentary

Knut: There is a long-standing precedent in Society heraldry which considered charged sails as being equivalent to arms of pretense and therefore forbidden for Society usage: "You may not charge a sail if the resulting sail conflicts with existing arms". As the sail here appear[s] identical to at least one mundane item of armory, this device must be returned. (The passage of the arms of Eisenmarche cited ... in the letter of intent is a special case ...: the arms of the Society, which the Board has specifically stated may be displayed by any group.) (LoAR 28 Dec 86, p. 13) (See also: LoAR 28 Feb 87, p. 22; LoAR 27 Aug 89, p. 20)



All of the examples of charged sails which we have been able find depictions of [in] period heraldry were displays of badges or arms claimed by the person or group who used the armory on which the sail appeared. Thus, such usage by definition creates an impression of pretense. When Master Wilhelm made the exception that groups might include a laurel wreath on a sail for group arms, he was reflecting this attitude, since the laurel wreath is an insignia to which all Society groups may lay claim. (LoAR 21 Jan 90, p. 20) Precedents Alisoun under Sail



Paul of Sunriver August of 1982 (via the West): Azure, a compass star Or.



Violation of RfS XI.4



(Fieldless) A single-masted caravel azure looks clear.



Julie: There is a long-standing precedent in Society heraldry which considered charged sails as being equivalent to arms of pretense and therefore forbidden for Society usage: "You may not charge a sail if the resulting sail conflicts with existing arms". As the sail here appear[s] identical to at least one mundane item of armory, this device must be returned. (The passage of the arms of Eisenmarche cited ... in the letter of intent is a special case ...: the arms of the Society, which the Board has specifically stated may be displayed by any group.) (LoAR 28 Dec 86, p. 13) (See also: LoAR 28 Feb 87, p. 22; LoAR 27 Aug 89, p. 20)



All of the examples of charged sails which we have been able find depictions of [in] period heraldry were displays of badges or arms claimed by the person or group who used the armory on which the sail appeared. Thus, such usage by definition creates an impression of pretense. When Master Wilhelm made the exception that groups might include a laurel wreath on a sail for group arms, he was reflecting this attitude, since the laurel wreath is an insignia to which all Society groups may lay claim. (LoAR 21 Jan 90, p. 20)



Æ&M: Unfortunately, the charge on the sail must be removed, due to prior precedent.



From the Precedents of Alisoun MacCoul of Elphane, The Combined Volume,September 1986 - June 1990: Sail - There is a long-standing precedent in Society heraldry which considered charged sails as being equivalent to arms of pretense and therefore forbidden for Society usage: "You may not charge a sail if the resulting sail conflicts with existing arms". As the sail here appear[s] identical to at least one mundane item of armory, this device must be returned. (The passage of the arms of Eisenmarche cited ... in the letter of intent is a special case ...: the arms of the Society, which the Board has specifically stated may be displayed by any group.) (LoAR 28 Dec 86, p. 13) (See also: LoAR 28 Feb 87, p. 22; LoAR 27 Aug 89, p. 20)



All of the examples of charged sails which we have been able find depictions of [in] period heraldry were displays of badges or arms claimed by the person or group who used the armory on which the sail appeared. Thus, such usage by definition creates an impression of pretense. When Master Wilhelm made the exception that groups might include a laurel wreath on a sail for group arms, he was reflecting this attitude, since the laurel wreath is an insignia to which all Society groups may lay claim. (LoAR 21 Jan 90, p. 20)



Fretty: This badge ((Fieldless) A single-masted caravel azure, the sail charged with a compass star elongated to base Or) seems to be, somewhat astoundingly, clear of conflict. The closest is the College of the Voyagers (3/90), (Fieldless) A long ship and in chief a comet azure, which should have the automatic CD for Fieldless, a CD for the removal of the comet, and a possible CD for the addition of the charge on the sail.





Done by my hand this feast of Saint Valentine,

Aryanhwy merch Catmael, Rouge Scarpe

Sara L. Friedemann
150 Langdon #B2
Madison, WI 53703
sfriedemann@students.wisc.edu


Disclaimer: This page is not officially sanctioned by the SCA, Inc., the Middle Kingdom, or the MK College of Heralds. It is a private project of the Escutcheon Herald (Paul Wickenden of Thanet) who has based the information published here on publicly-available documentation.