This is the March 2004 Middle Kingdom Letter of Acceptances and Returns for Escutcheon’s January 2004 Letter of Intent.

Unless otherwise noted, all clients will accept changes. {Comments in braces {} were removed from the Letter of Intent sent to Laurel and the College of Arms. Names, devices, or badges in braces have been returned or pended; general comments or replies to commentary are also placed in braces. Commentary, rulings, etc. by Dragon are placed in small cap print.}. Thanks to Aryanhwy merch Catmael, ∆lfreda śt ∆thelwealda & Mikhail of Lubelska, Femke de Roas, Maelcolum Mor mac Lachlainn, and Master John ap Wynne for their commentary this month. Note – comments by Talan Gwynek were made to the MK-Heralds list and forwarded to me. They will be included here.

Please note, I will not be making any name changes but will be sending the commentary on to the CoA.


1. Alaric le Fevre – New Badge – Per bend sinister nebuly vert and sable, {in bend} a cross patonce and a shamrock Or.
(Name registered January 1996)

Ary - Nicely drawn nebuly! "In bend" can be dropped from the blazon, since that is the default for two charges on a field divided per bend sinister.

This doesn't conflict with Wynne MacGillbride (reg. 01/98 via Atenveldt), "Per bend sinister nebuly purpure and vert, two trefoils slipped argent." There is one CD for changing the field, one for changing the tincture of the charges, and one for changing half the type of charges. This was the closest I found.

Maelcolum - Extremely pretty, boldly done.  [I like boldly.]  The charges seem a little small, though, but that’s merely an aesthetic quibble, and I’m not sure how much larger they could be made without encroaching on the field division.  I find no conflicts here, though I’m not the greatest at conflict checking.

Femke - The nebuly division could have a little more of an S-curve to it. The contrast between the two parts of the field is a little questionable. No conflicts found.

Talan - Nicely drawn nebuly! [Of course: he's a Cleftlander! (Which is doubtless why he chose the partition.)]

Pass on to Laurel

2. Blanche Northwood – New Name
Client will not accept major changes.

“Faire Names for English Folk: Late Sixteenth Century English Names”, by Chris Laning

http:/www.s-gabriel.org/names/christian/fairnames/givennames.html

“Faire Names for English Folk: Late Sixteenth Century English Names”, by Chris Laning

http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/christian/fairnames/surnames.html

Maelcolum - I notice she cites two St. Gabriel sources for her names.  As my onomastic knowledge can be measured in thimblefuls, I’ll defer to them unless Master Talan can come up with something.  They look from the same place and same period, so, it seems pretty straightforward.

Femke - Both elements are fine, but perhaps Blance of Northwood would be a better construction?

Pass on to Laurel

3. Ian O’Muirgheasa of Strikkenwoode – New Name and Device – Per bend wavy argent and vert, two trefoils {in bend sinister}, counterchanged.

Client will not accept major changes.

“The Dictionary of Irish Names”, Ida Grethan, p. 263
“Irish Families”, Edward MacLysaght, p. 231
“Book of Irish Families Great and Small”, Michael O’Laughlin, p. 196

Device Commentary:

Knut - Per bend wavy argent and vert, two trefoils counterchanged.
Hedvig Kettuin - June of 1999 (via Drachenwald):
Per bend vert and argent, issuant from the line of division two trefoils counterchanged
CD field, CD orientation of primaries. No CD arrangement, forced move.

Clear

Ary - "In bend sinister" should be dropped from the blazon, since this is the default for two charges on a field divided per bend. Reblazon: "Per bend wavy argent and vert, two trefoils slipped counterchanged."
This wavy blurs the line between being wavy and nebuly. This might be a cause for return, since it is not clearly one or the other.
This is clear of Finn O'Collan (reg. 12/00 via Ansteorra), "Per

bend argent and vert, a bend between two shamrocks counterchanged," by X.1 Addition of Primary Charges. It's clear of P√°draig R√ļad √“ Maolag√°in (reg. 04/2001 via Ansteorra), "Per bend argent and vert, a shamrock and a Celtic cross counterchanged," with one CD for changing half the type of primary charge, and one for the complex line of division. Looks clear to me.

Talan (responding to Ary) – “This wavy blurs the line between being wavy and nebuly.”
Not at all. It's an excellent wavy: it's nice and deep, and there's no sign of the S-bends required to produce nebuly.

Maelcolum - I like the device and find no conflicts

NAME COMMENTARY:

Ary - This is an inadequate summary of the documentation, since no evidence is given that any of the elements is found before 1600, or are otherwise acceptable for SCA purposes.
<Ian> is a modern name, which has been ruled SCA-comptabile. From the precedents of Francois:
"Ian has been ruled SCA-compatible. [Ian MacClennan, 08/01, A-Caid]"

There is one weirdness for using a SCA-compatible name element.

<O'Murigheasa> is a hybrid English/Gaelic spelling, which violates RfS III.1.a "Linguistic Consistency - Each phrase must be grammatically correct according to the usage of a single language." It is also a typo: the Gaelic name is spelled <Muir->. A fully Gaelic form is <√“ Muirgheasa>, according to Woulfe (who has this as a header form). Fully English forms are <O Murrissa>, <O Morisa>, and <O Morrisy>, temp. Eliz I - James I, from the same source. Woulfe says this is "the name of a branch of the Ui Fiachrach who were formly chiefs of a district on the southern shore of Sligo Bay, in the barony of Tireragh."

<Ian> is treated as a Scots form of the name, not a Gaelic one. (This is implicit in the following precedent from Francois: "Submitted as Michael Ian Sinclair, this name has two problems.

The name Ian has not been documented to period but has been declared SCA-compatible. Use of an SCA-compatible name is a weirdness. Additionally, double given names in Scots have also been ruled a weirdness. Therefore, this name had two weirdnesses and would need to be returned. [Michael Sinclair, 08/01, A-Merides]")

Gaelic/Scots combinations were ruled a weirdness on the 02/2000 LoAR. Scots/English combinations were ruled a weirdness on the 09/2001 LoAR. Therefore, <Ian> is not registerable using either the Gaelic or the English form of the byname.

The Scottish Gaels did not use clan style bynames, so there is no appropriate Scots form to recommend.

The Shire of Strikkenwoode's name was registered February 1987 via the Middle. According to Jaelle's 04/1998 cover letter, use of a SCA branch name as a locative is not a weirdness:

"Use of Official SCA Group Names in SCA Personal Names

"There has been a number of commenters counting the use of an SCA branch name in an SCA name submission as a "weirdness" if the official group name is in poor style -- i.e. not in the form of a documentable place-name. The use of any registered official groups will not count as a weirdness. To decide on a case-by-case basis if the group name is a weirdness in a personal name submission requires an additional, unnecessary level of decision."

The LoI gives no indication what changes the submitter allows, nor his preferences concerning what is most important to him, or if he has any authenticity request. On the assumption that no information was included because the submitter has no preferences and accepts all changes, there are a few recommendations I can make:

Dropping the first byname and sending this forward as <Ian of Strikkenwoode>, removing the lingual weirdness.

Changing the given name to <John>, thus removing the weirdness caused by SCA-compatability. <John> is "a fairly common English name in the 12th-15th C", according to Withycombe s.n. John.

Changing the given name to <Eoan>, thus removing the lingual weirdness. <Eoan> is cited as a 13th century form of <Eoin>, in OCM s.n. Eoin. <Eoan √“ Muirgheasa of Strikkenwoode> is the closest registerable form to the submitted form.

Talan (responding to Ary) - That's why it's inadequate _as_documentation_; it may, however, be a perfectly adequate summary of the documentation actually presented, especially the Grehan. (Actually, I suspect that _Irish Families_ has at least a little chronological information, but it's serving as thestand for my heavy and extremely hot laptop at the moment, so I'm not going to look.)

“O'Murigheasa> is a hybrid English/Gaelic spelling, which violates RfS III.1.a "Linguistic Consistency - Each phrase must be grammatically correct according to the usage of a single language." “

Technically speaking, this has nothing to do with grammar; it's a matter of orthography.

“ It is also a typo: the Gaelic name is spelled <Muir->.”

It may just be a typo in the ILoI, since it's right in the quoted documentation. {This was a typo on Escuthcheon’s letter, I have put the client’s spelling on this document. - EdV}

“A fully Gaelic form is <√“ Muirgheasa”

I assume that that's <” Muirgheasa>; I've made that change without further comment below.

“ The Shire of Strikkenwoode's name was registered February 1987 via the Middle. According to Jaelle's 04/1998 cover letter, use of a SCA branch name as a locative is not a weirdness: “

[snip]

Pbbbbt. That's what she was paid the big bucks for. <g>

“The LoI gives no indication what changes the submitter allows, nor his preferences concerning what is most important to him, or if he has any authenticity request. On the assumption that no information was included because the submitter has no preferences and accepts all changes, there are a few recommendations I can make:

Dropping the first byname and sending this forward as <Ian of Strikkenwoode>, removing the lingual weirdness.”

Wouldn't do that without at least trying to get in touch with him; it's a pretty big change.

“Changing the given name to <John>, thus removing the weirdness caused by SCA-compatability. <John> is "a fairly common English name in the 12th-15th C", according to Withycombe s.n. John.”

I suspect that he'd prefer something a little more Irish. The <O'> in the surname is probably from ignorance, given that the rest of the spelling is clearly Irish.

“ Changing the given name to <Eoan>, thus removing the lingual weirdness. <Eoan> is cited as a 13th century form of <Eoin>, in OCM s.n. Eoin. <Eoan ” Muirgheasa of Strikkenwoode> is the closest registerable form to the submitted form.”

<Ioan>, also noted in OCM as a form in use in the 13th c., is closer visually. (There's essentially no difference in pronunciation.) <Eoan> is also a period form, at least for the name of the apostle.

Maelcolum - Ian, as I recall is Scottish, and O’Murigheasa is Irish.  Hmm.  The surname looks to be of a different period than Ian, in fact, I seem to remember Ian being post period, though there are Ian’s registered.  Probably Scottish and Irish names are compatible on the weirdness table, but I’m not sure cross culture and cross time period wouldn’t violate the “more than one weirdness” clause.  Of course, I may be way off, but it sounds wrong.  Unless he’s allowed for modification, and unless someone who knows more than me says otherwise, I’d return it for tweaking.  If it needs modified, I’m no help.  Eoin?  Isn’t that Irish?  Beats me.  TALAN!  ARY!

Femke - <Ian> has already been ruled SCA compatible, and <O’Murigheasa> looks like an attempt at the anglicanized version of Ui Murigheasa – though I’m not sure what the correct spelling ought to be and don’t have the correct references. Is there any documentation for Strikkenwoode? It seems odd to have an Irish name (albeit an anglicanized spelling), with a second, locative byname.

John ap Wynne – Ian: see Norman p. 242-common in Ireland as “Ion” after 1535; Zaczek, p. 92 – Scottish variants; Todd, pp. 124-125; Conway, pp. 75-76; o’Corrain/Maguire, p. 88 under ‘Eoin”; Coghlan, p. 39

O’Muirgheasa: clients sources are ok but see MacLysaght, p. 106 under ‘feighry’ (related clan)

The Device is fine as is and will pass to Laurel.
As mentioned above, I make no changes or decisions on names – Pass to Laurel.

4. Iron Gate, Canton of – New Name and Device – Per chevron ermine and sable, a laurel wreath vert and a portcullis Or. [On LoI as Per chevron ermine and sable, a portcullis or in base, a laurel wreath vert and has been changed here to a more proper blazon.]

Petition is included in paperwork.
Client would prefer minor changes in language for 15th or 16th century but will not accept major changes.

Iron – OED, p. 481 (reference to an iron fortress)
Gate – OED, p. 73

DEVICE COMMENTS:

Knut - Per chevron ermine and sable, in pale a laurel wreath vert and a portcullis Or

The armoury is displayed on non-standard forms. This risks an administrative return for improper paperwork.
Clear

Ary - This is not on a standard esctucheon form. The 09/2003 cover letter says "The standard forms are the base forms used for any creation or modifications of the submission forms. _Laurel Sovereign of Arms must approve all alterations or updates to the submission forms in writing prior to the use of the forms._" If such written permission was not included with this submission, this must be returned for not used the standard forms.

The line of division also blurs the line between "per chevron" and "a point pointed." RfS VII.7.a says "Elements must be recognizable solely from their appearance." This is not. This must be returned for redrawing.

Maelcolum - Okay, the device, insofar as the blazon goes needs blazon-fu, as Ary might say.  And it’s misspelled.  “Per chevron ermine and sable, a laurel wreath vert (most honorable charge first!) and a portcullis Or”. (Capitalize the “Or”)  No need for the “In Chief” and “in base”.  The blazon doesn’t seem to be in conflict with anything.

 The emblazon is the show stopper here. That doesn’t look to be on a standard escutcheon. (Blazon 95?)  The wreath is transparent, and too small, unidentifiable.  Not BOLD enough.  The “per chevron” is that non-euclidean and Cthulian wrong – too steep and the base should be wider.  This needs redrawn, just plain and simple.  And I do sympathize with having to do it on a computer, because I myself am a lousy artist.

Femke - This device needs to be returned for a redraw on the appropriate escutcheon. No conflicts noted.

?lfreda and Mikhail - The laurel wreath looks a bit lost in the busy-ness of the ermine field, but it's probably ok.

NAME COMMENTARY:

Ary - No evidence was provided that <Iron Gate> follows medieval English place naming practices.

The OED online s.v. iron (adjective) has citations as early as Beowulf:

Beowulf (Z.) 2829 Ac him irenna eca for-namon.
The earliest citation for the spelling <iron> is 1697:
1697 DRYDEN Virg. Georg. I. 220 First Ceres..arm'd with Iron Shares the crooked Plough.
This nearly 50 years out of our grey area, and thus this spelling is not, without further evidence, registerable.

The only place in the entry that I find a reference to "fortress" is 1681:

1861 J. G. SHEPPARD Fall Rome i. 12 Yet the German still guards, though no longer in a Lombard fortress, the iron Crown.
In OED online s.v. gate, the earliest citation is from 778:

778 Charter in Birch Cartul. Saxon. I. 315 Et eodem septo to hadfeld 6eate. et eodem septo to baggan 6ete.

I'm using the '6' to represent a letter I've never seen before; it looks like a precursor to the yogh (which would make sense, since it's standing in for a 'g'). It looks like a dash with a little loop hanging down from the center. Talan - what is this called?

The earliest citation for the spelling <gate> is from c1330:

c1330 R. BRUNNE Chron. (1810) 183 With grete duble cheynes drauhen ouer {th}e gate.

The 05/2002 return of the heraldic title <Irendon Herald>, where <Irendon> was proposed as a place name, is relevant here:

"Northshield, Principality of. Heraldic title Irendon Herald.

"This title was submitted as a heraldic title formed from a placename. However, the only example found of a placename with Iren- as a protheme is Irenacton which prepends Iren- to an already existing placename, Acton. Evidence was found of -don used as a deuterotheme in placenames (including Blaydon), but no evidence was found of Don as an independent placename. Lacking such evidence, Irendon does not follow the pattern of Irenacton and is not a plausible placename. [Middle-R, LoAR]"

Mills s.n. Acton dates <Irenacton> to 1248.

Given this precedent, in order to support <Iron Gate> as a plausible place name, we need to find an independent place name <Gate> to which <Iron> in some period spelling could be appended.

Ekwall s.n. gata says "ON OSw <gata> 'a road', ME <gate>, is found in names of roads and streets in the north and the Scandinavian Midlans, as in <Botcher->, <Framwellgate>. Sometimes such names have become names of places, such as <Clappersgate>, <Galgate>, <Harrogate>, <Holgate>."

There are a number of place names that have <Gate-> or <Gat-> as a prototheme (sometimes with the above etymology, sometimes from OE <g{a-}t> 'goat'). However, there is no place that is name simply <Gate>. Mills also has nothing.

This needs to be returned for lack of documentation.

Talan – (responding to Ary)
“No evidence was provided that <Iron Gate> follows medieval English place naming practices.”
The OED online s.v. iron (adjective) has citations as early as Beowulf:
Beowulf (Z.) 2829 Ac him irenna eca for-namon.
And note ca.1400 a quotation containing the phrase <yrne 3ates> 'iron gates'.

“The earliest citation for the spelling <iron> is 1697: 1697 DRYDEN Virg. Georg. I. 220 First Ceres..arm'd with Iron Shares the crooked Plough.”

This nearly 50 years out of our grey area, and thus this spelling is not, without further evidence, registerable.

But further evidence is present in the OED. If you go to the head of the article on the adjective, you'll see that for forms you're directed to the article on the noun. There the form <iron> is dated '5-', meaning that they had citations for it from the 15th c. onwards. And if you comb through the quotations in the adjective article, under sense 3f you'll find 'in an iron world' dated a1592, i.e., ante(before) 1592, while under sense 4a there's a quotation from Shakespeare's 'Richard III', 1593, about 'Iron-witted Fooles'. (There are also several quotations from about the same time in which it's spelled <yron>.)

And I just noticed that if you go to RW s.n. <Iremonger>, you'll find <Elyas le Ironmongere> 1294, though at such an early date that must be a most atypical spelling.

“In OED online s.v. gate, the earliest citation is from 778: 778 Charter in Birch Cartul. Saxon. I. 315 Et eodem septo to hadfeld 6eate. et eodem septo to baggan 6ete.

I'm using the '6' to represent a letter I've never seen before; it looks like a precursor to the yogh (which would make sense, since it's standing in for a 'g'). It looks like a dash with a little loop hanging down from the center. Talan - what is this called?“

It's an insular <g>, a standardized form of the version of <g> used in OE bookhands; eventually it was replaced by the Carolingian <g>, the one with two loops. It developed into the ME yogh, and there's no real harm in calling it a yogh. The OED uses it for a specific purpose, however.

In OE <g> represented four different sounds: voiced velar stop (as in <go>), voiced palatal stop (as in <geek>, and yes, they are slightly different sounds), voiced velar fricative (\gh\), and voiced palatal fricative (\y\ with a fair bit of friction). In OE quotations the OED uses <g> (ordinary Carolingian <g>) for the two stop sounds and <3> (insular <g>, yogh) for the two fricative sounds. This is a purely editorial device, however; in the original MS., the <g>s in <baggan> will have had the same form as the first letter of the last word of the quotation.

“The earliest citation for the spelling <gate> is from c1330: c1330 R. BRUNNE Chron. (1810) 183 With grete duble cheynes drauhen ouer {th}e gate.”

The form appears in the 13th c., however, according to the summary of forms at the beginning of the article. This is confirmed by citations in some onomastic sources.

“The 05/2002 return of the heraldic title <Irendon Herald>, where <Irendon> was proposed as a place name, is relevant here:

"Northshield, Principality of. Heraldic title Irendon Herald.

"This title was submitted as a heraldic title formed from a placename. However, the only example found of a placename with Iren- as a protheme is Irenacton which prepends Iren- to an already existing placename, Acton. Evidence was found of -don used as a deuterotheme in placenames (including Blaydon), but no evidence was found of Don as an independent placename. Lacking such evidence, Irendon does not follow the pattern of Irenacton and is not a plausible placename. [Middle-R, LoAR]" “

Inadequate information. Smith s.v. <isern> mentions three place-names incorporating the OE word for 'iron', though none is significant enough to have made it into Ekwall or Mills, and none uses the form <iren>. (OE had three forms of the word: <isern>, the oldest form; <isen>, a development similar to that seen in German <Eisen>; and <iren>.) The place-names in question (in their modern forms) are <Easneye>, <Isenhurst>, <Isnage>. The generics are OE <eg> 'an island' for the first and <hyrst> 'a hillock, a copse, a wooded eminence' for the last two. (Yes, I'd love to know how something like <Isenhyrst> turned into <Isnage>, but Smith gives only the modern form and the etymology.) The OED says that in OE the form <iren> is found mostly in poetry, so <Irendon> probably isn't the best formation, but <Isendun> 'iron hill' would be a reasonable parallel to <Isenhurst. (Smith s.v. <dun> notes that the term seems to have been used for everything from a slight gentle slope to a high mountain.)

Unfortunately, I don't think that this really justifies <Isengate>, let alone <Irengate> or the like. The three place-names incorporating the OE word (as distinct from the ME <Irenacton>) appear to refer to places where iron was obtained or perhaps worked; OE <geat> 'a hole, an opening, a gap, esp. in a wall, fence, or ditch; a gate' doesn't fit this model at all well.

“Mills s.n. Acton dates <Irenacton> to 1248.

Given this precedent, in order to support <Iron Gate> as a plausible place name, we need to find an independent place name <Gate> to which <Iron> in some period spelling could be appended.”

Or find a completely different justification; see below.

“Ekwall s.n. gata says "ON OSw <gata> 'a road', ME <gate>, is found in names of roads and streets in the north and the Scandinavian Midlans, as in <Botcher->, <Framwellgate>. Sometimes such names have become names of places, such as <Clappersgate>, <Galgate>, <Harrogate>, <Holgate>."’

There is a street named <Iron Gate> in Derby (Cameron, 226). This is within the Danelaw, and Cameron says that it refers to workers in iron, so <Gate> here will be from ON <gata>, not OE <geat>. (There actually are examples of streets named after gates, e.g., Eastgate and Westgate in Lincoln.)

The question is whether street names based on theoccupations of the people who lived and worked in them have become names of larger communities. None of your examples above fits that pattern; they are respectively 'road to a(rough) bridge', perhaps 'Galloway road' but uncertain, perhaps 'road to a cairn', and 'sunken road'. Presumably these communities grew up along the roads in question. Smith s.v. <gata> lists several place-names of the desired type, as does Cameron, but they're all names of streets, not names of towns. In general one would expect that a street of artisans of a particular type would grow up within an existing community, one that presumably would already have a name.

Of course such a street name can subsequently become the (possibly unofficial) name of a district within a town, so it isn't necessarily all that unreasonable a choice for an SCA branch name anyway. There is at least one example of such a branch name: the branch name <Skeldergate> was registered 1/93. (It was then the name of a College; the group is now a canton -- not college -- of the Barony of Septentria in Ealdormere.) <Skeldergate> is the name of street in York, from ON <skjaldara-gata> 'street of the shieldmakers'. Given this precedent, a well-formed period version of <Iron Gate> would clearly have to be passed at kingdom level.

What forms of <Iron Gate> are actually reasonable? Given the meaning of the Derby model, the obvious starting point is ON <jŠrngata> 'iron street', metonymic for 'street of the iron-workers'. Normal phonetic development would likely produce <Yarngate> ca.1300, but with this name a normal phonetic development may actually be unlikely; at least it would not be at all surprising to find the ON first element replaced by its very similar English cognate. Such replacement is not particularly unusual.

Another possibility is a ME coinage. The OED s.v. <gate> sb.2 shows that ON <gata> was actually borrowed into English by the 13th c.; it appears as <gate> in a citation from ca.1200. It eventually went out of use in standard English, but it remained in use in Scots and northern dialects at least down to the 20th c.

There are many real-world street-names that fit one or the other of these two patterns. Smith s.v. <flesshewer>, a ME term for a butcher, mentions <Fletcher Gate> in Nottingham. S.v. <fiscere>, OE 'fisherman', he notes <Fishergate> in York; s.v. <walcere>, OE 'a cloth-dresser, a fuller', <Walkergate> in Lincoln; s.v. <saltere>, OE 'a salter, a salt-worker, a salt-merchant', <Saltergate> in Lincoln; and s.v. <pottere>, OE 'a pot-maker', <Pottergate> in Lincoln.

Cameron (226-7) mentions streets named <Lister Gate> 'street of the dyers', <Roper Gate> 'street of the rope-makers', <Sadler Gate> 'street of the saddlers', and <Gluman Gate> 'street of the minstrels', all containing either ON <gata> or ME <gate> derived from it. The first elements of these are respectively ME <litestere>, <listere> 'a dyer', from OE <lit> 'a color, a dye'; ME <ropere> 'a rope-maker', from OE <rŠp> 'a rope'; ME <sadlere> ' saddler', from OE <sadol> 'a saddle'; and OE <glŪwman>, <glťoman> 'a minstrel'. Theseidentifications are mine, since Cameron doesn't explicitlyidentify the etyma in question, but all are obvious from themeanings given by him and the modern forms. None of the elements can be derived directly from ON; all must be either new words in ME or ME forms of OE words.

The OED s.v. <iron> says that <iren> was the usual ME form. Thus, a medieval <Irengate>, either created in ME or produced by substituting an English for a Scandinavian form of the first element, is entirely possible as a medieval (e.g., 13th c.) street name. Indeed, the Derby street name must have been created in one of these ways, probably as a ME creation.

In short, if the group allows minor changes, this should be sent on as <Irengate>. Pelican might decide that street names are no longer acceptable as SCA branch names, but that's definitely Pelican's decision to make.

Femke - I believe Talan and his OED have commented on this at length

?lfreda and Mikhail - From the OED online edition, we have found a place with the phrase "gate" in its name, albeit an alternate spelling, dated to 1610.

"Gate, n.1 13. Special comb
...

1610 N. Riding Rec. (1884) I. 201 For not making a sufficient *Yate stead being a common way in a place called Hurwood Yate. ..."

The device is on the correct forms, the client has glued copies of the device onto the form and, unfortunately, the small picture is smaller than the shield on the form. The extra lines should have been removed on the LoI. Ary mentioned that the line of division is inadequate. I agree that it could be drawn better, but I do not believe this is enough of a problem to return it. It was also mentioned that the laurel wreath is somewhat obscured. I agree, but do not feel this is enough to send it back for a redraw and will leave that decision up to laurel. Since there are no conflicts, and since I am not going to penalize the client for poor pasting ability, this device is being passed to Laurel.

Based on my resolve not to make changes or do anything with names, and mostly based on Talan’s comment that it is a decision for Pelican – the name is being passed to Laurel.

 

Done in Service,

Elena de Vexin
Rouge Scarpe Herald


John ap Wynne’s Bibliography:

1 Coghlan, Ronan, Irish First Names, Appletree Press Ltd, Belfast, 1985
2. Conway, D.J., Celtic Book of Names, Carroll Publishing Group, Seacaucus, NJ, 1999
3. MacLysaght, Edward, Surnames of Ireland, Irish Academic Press Ltd, Dublin, 1991
4. Norman, Teresa, Names Through the Ages, Berkley Books, New York, 1999
5. O’Corrain, Donnchadh, & Maguire, Fidelma, Irish Names, Lilliput Press Ltd, Dublin, 1981, 1990
6. Todd. Loreto, Celtic Names for Children, O’Brien Press Ltd, Dublin, 1998
7. Zaczek, Iain, Book of Scottish Names, Barnes & Noble Books, New York, 2001

 


 

Disclaimer: This page is not officially sanctioned by the SCA, Inc., the Middle Kingdom, or the College of Arms. It is a private project of the Escutcheon Herald (Ana Linch) who has based the information published here on publicly available documentation.