This is the April 2005 Middle Kingdom Letter of Acceptances and Returns for Escutcheon’s February 2005 Letter of Intent.

Unless otherwise noted, all clients will accept changes. Comments in braces {} were removed from the Letter of Intent sent to Laurel and the College of Arms. Names, devices, or badges in braces have been returned or pended. Commentary, rulings, etc. by Rouge Scarpe are placed in CAP PRINT. Thanks to Master Talan, Master John ap Wynne, Canute, AElfreda and Mikhail (A&M), Percival and Master Thorvald (P&T) for this month’s commentary.

 


1) al Ja'far, Shire of -- New Name and {Device -- Argent, a lizard tergiant within a laurel wreath vert, on a chief gules two scimitars in saltire Or.}
(Lebanon, IN)

They will *not* accept major changes and wishes to mean "in memory of Ja'far al Safa." Ja'far al Safar was reg'd with Laurel Feb '90.

According to the paperwork:

"Found in "The Times Atlas of the World," 7 ed. by John Bartholomew & Son Limited p. 93 and on plate 34 quardrant D- 8. (Nothing else was given.)
(http://www.highbeam.com/library/doc0.asp?DOCID=IPI%3A30508527&refid=ip_encyclopedia_hf)
(http://www.indexmundi.com/z/?Lat=30.2933333&t=p&r=120&p=al_jafr&cc=jo&c=jordan)"

Esct. Note: No summaries of the urls were given and if you use the second one, you get Bolivia. I'm not sure where they are going using these urls as no explainations were given.

Petition is included with name and device.

Name Commentary

Talan - This isn't the first attempt to name a branch after someone, and the thoughtful consensus has been that it's a bad idea. It ties the game a little too closely to the real world. It's quite possible that some years hence a significant part of the group will not feel the same way about Ja'far. I have a recollection that at least one such attempt was returned, either at kingdom or at Laurel, but I no longer remember the details. This case may be a little different, though; see below.

> Ja'far al Safar was reg'd with Laurel Feb '90.

The name is registered as <Ja'far al-Safa>. This is actually wrong: the first element should be <Ja`far>, not <Ja'far> [Azieza Hamid, The Book of Muslim Names (London: MELS, 1985), s.n. <Ja`far>; Bayard Dodge, ed. and trans., The Fihrist of al-Nadiim, vol. II (New York: Columbia University Press, 1970), Biographical Index, pp.1020-2]. (In transcriptions the symbols <`> and <'> represent two different Arabic letters, <`ayn> and <'alif>, respectively.)

The name <Ja`far> is derived from the word <ja`far> 'stream, rivulet' (Hamid, loc. cit.). <Al Ja`far> 'the small stream' is therefore a reasonable-sounding place-name in its own right, without reference to any person. Unfortunately, the fact that something sounds reasonable doesn't guarantee that it's authentic, so we have to look into actual Arabic place-naming practice. The URLs offered by the submitters are unhelpful (see below), but a bit of searching on the web turns up this one:

<http://www.fallingrain.com/world/SA/0/Al_Jafr.html>

It shows that there is a place in Saudi Arabia whose name is variously Englished as <Al Jafr>, <Jafr>, <Bab-al-Jafar>, <Jafar>, <Djafar>, and <Bb-al-Jafar> (where in the last one I've used a circumflex to represent the macron on the web page). The personal name <Ja`far> is often sloppily transcribed simply as <Jafar> -- there are numerous examples of this on the web -- so it seems very likely that this place-name actually contains the word <ja`far> 'stream'. <Bb> is a fairly well-known Arabic place-name element meaning 'gate', and the full name actually appears to be <Bb-al-Ja`far> 'Gate of the Stream'; possibly it's at the entrance to a valley.

All in all it appears that <al-Ja`far> 'the Stream' might well be a reasonable Arabic place-name.

> According to the paperwork:

> "Found in "The Times Atlas of the World," 7 ed. by John Bartholomew & Son Limited p. 93 and on plate 34 quardrant D- 8. (Nothing else was given.)

> (http://www.highbeam.com/library/doc0.asp?DOCID=IPI%3A30508527&refid=ip_encyclopedia_hf)

This one requires me to accept cookies, which is annoying in the first place, and then seems to require me to sign up for their service in order to read the article. That is not acceptable documentation.

> (http://www.indexmundi.com/z/?Lat=30.2933333&t=p&r=120&p=al_jafr&cc=jo&c=jordan)"

This was apparently supposed to be the following URL:

<http://www.indexmundi.com/z/?lat=30.2933333&lon=36.2138889&t=p&r=120&p=al_jafr&cc=jo&c=jordan>

It brings up a map of the world showing the location of a place in Jordan called <Al Jafr>.

Device Commentary

Canute - Argent, a lizard tergiant between two sprigs of laurel vert, on a chief gules two scimitars in saltire Or

... the laurel wreath is not drawn correctly. "A properly drawn laurel wreath should not have sufficient room between its tips to place another charge. [Darkstone, College of, 02/00, R-Middle]" [Uma, Shire of, 10/01, R-Drachenwald]

Precedents - Franois, under WREATH

This has a borderline complexity count of eight.

Clear

Return for redraw.

A&M - The laurel wreath in this device is drawn incorrectly, and thus this submission must be returned. Since multiple wreaths are allowed, perhaps 3 laurel wreaths as secondaries, instead of one large one encircling the salamander, might be an option. 
 
From the Administrative Handbook of the SCA College of Arms: 
II.D.2. Branch Arms - The single piece of armory associated with the Branch Name of a Society branch which uniquely identifies that branch. By Society convention, all branch arms must include one *** or more*** laurel wreaths as an important element in the design. ... [my emphasis] 

P&T - It is our opinion that this depiction of the laurel wreath is quite acceptable.

NAME CHANGED TO <Shire al Ja`Far> AND PASSED TO LAUREL, DEVICE RETURNED FOR REDRAW. CLIENT WILL BE ADVISED ON PRECEDENTS FOR WREATH. BLAZON INCLUDED THE COLOR OF THE SCIMITARS ON THE FORMS.

2) Annais de Bordeaux (F) -- New Name and Device --Purpure, an argent peacock in its pride, eye feathers orbed vert, between three estoille argent
(Marche of Three Towers)

BLAZON CHANGE: Purpure, a peacock in its pride argent the tail marked vert, between three estoilles argent.

Client will *not* accept major changes and cares for 1200 English and French.

Esct Note: This was pended from last month while waiting for correct copies of device form.

[Annais] -- Withycombe, "The Oxford Dic. of Eng. Names," p 6-7, s.n. Anes c. [Annais] 1218

[Bordeaux] -- Morlett, "D. E. de Noms de Famille," p 122 s.n. Bordes no dates given.

Name Commentary

Talan - > Client will *not* accept major changes and cares for 1200 English and French.

> [Annais] -- Withycombe, "The Oxford Dic. of Eng. Names," p 6-7, s.n. Anes c. [Annais] 1218

That should be s.n. <Agnes>.

> [Bordeaux] -- Morlett,

That's 'Morlet'.

> "D. E. de Noms de Famille," p 122 s.n. Bordes no dates given.

I don't have this particular source, but I very much doubt that the citation is relevant. <Bordes> is from <borde> 'farm'; there is a diminutive <bordel> 'small farm' whose normal form in the modern language is <bordeau>. Despite the superficial similarity, this has nothing to do with the place-name <Bordeaux>, which derives from a first century <Burdigala> and is in record as <Bordeu> in 1280 (Dauzat s.n. <Borde>; Dauzat & Rostaing s.n. <Bordeaux>).

<Annais de Bordeu> would appear to meet the submitter's specifications reasonably well.

Device Commentary

Talan - The blazon is out of order: Purpure, a peacock in its pride argent tail eyed vert between three estoiles argent.

Canute - Purpure, a peacock in its pride argent tail orbed vert between three estoiles argent - Clear

P&T - Blazon correction: The tincture always comes after the charge. Also, note the following Wreath precendent:

  • [(Fieldless) A peacock Or the tail marked gules] The markings on the tail of the peacock are the "eyes" of the tail feathers. However, we are hesitant to use the term eyed in the blazon, as was done in the Letter of Intent. The term eyed could be confused with the heraldic term orbed, which refers to the bird's eyes. [Sunnifa Eirksdttir, 10/01, A-Ansteorra]
  • Therefore, we recommend: Purpure, a peacock in its pride argent the tail marked vert, between three estoilles argent

    NAME AND DEVICE PASSED TO LAUREL. ACCORDING THE CITY OF BORDEAUX TOURIM OFFICE (http://www.bordeaux-tourisme.com/uk/decouvrir/zooms/plan_historique.html), THE CITY STARTED IN THE 3RD CENTRY BC BUT REALLY CAME INTO ITS OWN DUE TO THE MARRIAGE OF ELEANOR OF AQUITAINE TO HENRY II.

    3) Anne of Aylesford (F) -- New Name and Device -- Azure, a fess wavy argent between a mullet Or and a coney sejant erect argent
    (al Ja'far)

    Client will accept major changes and wishes 12-14th century England.

    [Anne] -- Withycombe, "Oxford Dic. of Eng. Names," p 25, s.n. Ann, c. Anne of Bohemia 1390. According to the paperwork: "Anne is a biblical name in common use throughout Europe since 500's (sic)."

    [Aylesford] -- According to the paperwork: "Aylesford is a village in Kent dating from 600's (at least)."

    Name Commentary

    Talan - > [Anne] -- Withycombe, "Oxford Dic. of Eng. Names," p 25,

    The title is _The Oxford Dictionary of English Christian Names_, in this case the 3rd edition.

    > s.n. Ann, c. Anne of Bohemia 1390. According to the paperwork: "Anne is a biblical name in common use throughout Europe since 500's (sic)."

    > [Aylesford] -- According to the paperwork: "Aylesford is a village in Kent dating from 600's (at least)."

    The byname <Dam Anne> 1327 'lady Anne', probably signifying that the bearer was a servant of a woman named <Anne>, shows that the form <Anne> was in use in the 14th century (Reaney & Wilson s.n. <Dambell>). (Most forename citations from the submitter's period are Latinized and show <Anna>, but this byname is not.) Reaney & Wilson s.n. <Aylesford> cite the byname <de Ailesford> 1202. S.n. <Aylesbury> he has <de Aylesbury> 1307. The first element of these names is the same, deriving from the Old English masculine name <gel> (Watts s.nn. <Aylesbury>, <Aylesford>), so <Anne of Aylesford> should be just fine for the early 14th century.

    Device Commentary

    Canute - The wavy should be regular. Clear

    P&T - The waves on the fess are not exactly drawn correctly. They should be more pronounced and symmetrical. I would expect a lot of flak from the College of Arms on this one. I do not know how lenient the current Wreath is. I would prefer to send it on with a comment that the client will be advised on the correction depiction.

    NAME AND DEVISE PASSED TO LAUREL. CLIENT WILL BE ADVISED TO DRAW THE WAVES ON THE FESS MORE PRONOUNCED AND SYMMETRICAL

    4) Ayla Volquin -- New Device -- Per fess wavy argent and azure, a winged panther passant reguardant sable incensed proper, a moon in her plenitude inverted argent.
    (Elyria, OH)
    (Name sent to Laurel, Dec '04)

    Device Commentary

    Canute - The "wavy" in the colour emblazon is pushing indented. I think that this depiction in the official emblazon violates RfS VII.7.a. It should be a bit bolder and needs more pronounced rounding.

    The moon inverted is odd and is probably at least a weirdness. It might even be returnable as an extension of the inverted beasties ban.

    Clear - Redraw.

    P&T - Obviously, the client wants a reflection of the moon in the water. Once again, the waves on the fess are not exactly drawn correctly. They should be more pronounced. The small flames on the panther make it hard to identify. This may be a case where the charge is actually too large, rendering it difficult to identify.

    A&M - Since the internal detailing on the moon does not grant any difference between it and a plate, inverting the moon is probably only a wierdness (as opposed to disallowed). 
    From the Precedents of Francoise:  [An astrolabe] Conflict with ... Barry argent and sable, a moon in her plenitude azure. There is a CD for changing the field, but no difference between a moon in her plenitude and an astrolabe. Moons in their plenitude are equivalent to roundels. "[The] astrolabe... conflicts with...[a roundel, with] nothing for the internal diapering of the primary (similar to the conflict between a moon in her plenitude and a plate.)" (LoAR June 1992 p.15). [Trimaris, Kingdom of, 06/02, R-Trimaris] 

    DEVICE PASSED TO LAUREL. CLIENT WILL BE ADVISED TO DRAW THE WAVES ON THE FESS MORE PRONOUNCED AND SYMMETRICAL

    5) Calybrid Ine Tere (F)- New Name
    (Ravenslake)

    Client will *not* accept major changes and cares more for Manx about 1500-ish. The client submitted one piece of documentation for all of the elements:

    "The Manorial Roll of the Isle of Man 1511-1515" translated from theLatin by the Late Rev. Theophilus Talbot, c. 1924, (http://www.isle-of-man.com/manxnotebook/fulltext/manroll/le.htm)

    [Calybrid] - Parish of Holy Trinity [Lezayre] from the Manorial Roll, 1511/1515 "From Calybrid ine Corleot for one cotage demised to her."

    [Ine Tere] -- Parish of St. Lupus from the Manorial Roll, 1511/1515
    ". . . Johnet Ine Tere for 1 cotage with garden 6d., And 1 chamber 4d., and another cotage with garden 8d., dismised to them as above."
    ". . . Agnes Ine Tere for 1 cotage 6d., and for another chamber with small garden 14d., And a moiety of 1 cellar 2s.demised as above."

    Name Commentary

    Talan - > "The Manorial Roll of the Isle of Man 1511-1515" translated from theLatin by the Late Rev. Theophilus Talbot, c. 1924, (http://www.isle-of-man.com/manxnotebook/fulltext/manroll/le.htm)

    This is correct for <Calybrid>; the URL for the <Ine Tere> documentation is

    <http://www.isle-of-man.com/manxnotebook/fulltext/manroll/mw.htm>.

    The main URL is

    <http://www.isle-of-man.com/manxnotebook/fulltext/manroll/index.htm#contents>.

    Otherwise the documentation and the name are both fine.

    John – When a client submits a period evidence to the heralds for his name, such as the Manorial Roll of the Isle of Man ( and be counted lucky, for it’s one of the few pieces of Manx period writing that we have), then the heralds ought to have no problem with passing the name – barring any conflicts mundanely, of course, with acclaiming such name. Assuming that the client took his name directly from this roll, let’s not hem and haw and say it wasn’t fit. There is, after all, no title involved.

    NAME PASSED TO LAUREL

    6) Colleen le Fey (F) -- New Name and Device -- Azure, on a pale between a decrescent and a sun argent, a sword sable.
    (Cleftlands)

    Client will *not* accept major changes.

    [Colleen] -- Legal name. Copy of driver's license included.

    [le Fey] --Academy of St. Gabriel Report #2815 (http://www.s-gabriel.org/2815)
    " . . . There is an English byname (surname) that derives from the Old French <fae> 'fairy' : <le Fey>, recorded in 1332." (Reaney, P. H., & R. M. Wilson, "A Dictionary of English Surnames", (London: Routledge, 1991; Oxford University Press, 1995). s.n. Fay )

    NAME AND DEVICE PASSED TO LAUREL.

    7) Isleifr Arnvarr (M) --Name Resubmission
    (White Waters)

    Client will accept major changes. The name "Isleifr" was returned for violation of rule III.2.a by Rouge Scarpe, Nov. '04.

    [Isleifr] -- (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/landnamabok.html ) "Viking Names found in the Landnamabok, by Aryanhwy merch Catmael, p 4 ". . . The following names were found 3 times: . . . Isleifr . . ."

    [Arnvarr] -- (http://hem.passagen.se/peter9/gram/l_namn.html?k), "Old Norse Name Formation <Arn> - eagle <-varr> - warrior (No dates given)

    Name Commentary

    Talan - > [Isleifr] -- (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/landnamabok.html )"Viking Names found in the Landnamabok, by Aryanhwy merch Catmael, p 4 ". . . The following names were found 3 times: . . . Isleifr . . ."

    The name is actually <sleifr>, though of course it also appears without the accent in some early sources. It was quite common in Iceland from the time of the Settlement onwards (E.H. Lind, Norsk-Islndska Dopnamn ock Fingerade Namn frn Medeltiden (Uppsala & Leipzig: 1905-1915, sup. Oslo, Uppsala and Kbenhavn: 1931), s.n. <sleifr>).

    > [Arnvarr] -- (http://hem.passagen.se/peter9/gram/l_namn.html?k), "Old Norse Name Formation <Arn> - eagle <-varr> - warrior (No dates given)

    There are no dates because no such name is actually known; this is just a list of name elements, and in this case one of the elements is doubtful.

    The following quotation is from Lena Peterson, Nordisk runnamnslexikon (Dictionary of Names from Old Norse Runic Inscriptions), Sprak- och folkminnes-institutet (Institute for Dialectology, Onomastics and Folklore Research), http://www.sofi.se/SOFIU/runlex/>, s.v. <-varr>:

    En vikingatida nordisk mask. personnamnsefterled <-varr> har betvivlats. En sdan skulle dock kunna antas, som ett

    nomen agentis till antingen germ. *<warn> 'vara vaksam' (fvn. adj. <varr> 'vaksam') eller germ. *<warjan> 'vrja,

    beskydda' (jfr pn.-e.l. <-warjaR> i urnord. runinskrifter)eller bdedera. Ett alternativ r att ett <-varr> har

    uppkommit genom att ha lsgjorts frn namn som -> <Bo,varr>, -> <Ingvarr>, -> <Svarr>, dr <-v-> hr till

    frleden. Ytterligare ett alternativ r att tolka de runnord. namnen p <-varr> som beroende p en fonetisk

    utveckling av -> <-varr>.

    My translation:

    A Viking age Norse masculine deuterotheme <-varr> has been called into question. Such an element could still be accepted as the nomen agentis either of Germanic *<warn>'to be vigilant, alert' or of Germanic *<warjan> 'to defend, to protect’ (cf. the deuterotheme <-warjaR> in Primitive Scandinavian runic inscriptions), or of both. The alternative is that <-varr> arose by being detached from names like <Bo,varr>, <Ingvarr>, and <Svarr>, where the <-v-> belongs to the first element. Additionally there is the alternative of interpreting the runic names in <-varr> as depending on a phonetic development of <-varr>.

    The runic names listed that *may* contain this element are <Fio,lvarr>, <Guvarr>, <Gunnvarr>, <GiRvarr>, <ivarr>,and <Uddvarr>, none of which is certain.

    In short, even the existence of a productive deuterotheme <-varr> is doubtful; there are some doubtful examples, and there are some names that at first sight may appear to have it but that actually split after the <-v-> (e.g., <Ingv-arr>). This is clearly not a good candidate for constructing a hypothetical name.

    Even if <Arnvarr> were acceptable, the name as a whole would be improperly constructed: the second element needs to be a nickname or a patronymic in <son>. (E.g., if <Arnvarr> were a name, the patronymic would be <Arnvars son>.)

    Since he's willing to accept major changes and, judging by his first submission, isn't too fussy about the second element, I suggest <Arnrs son> 'son of Arnrr'; according to Lind s.n. <Arnrr>, the name was common in Iceland from the 10th century on, and it sounds a bit like the hypothetical <Arnvarr>.

    NAME CHANGED TO <sleifr Arnrs son> AND PASSED TO LAUREL

    8) {Kieran O'Cathasaigh (M)-- New Name and Device -- Vert, a pale sable, an elephant and castle argent}
    (Legio Dragonis)

    Client will accept major changes wants Irish 5th century. The Client submitted a url with no copies: http://www.irishlane.com/ (this is not a free site). However, after talking to the client I think this works.

    [Kieran] -- Academy of St. Gabriel Report #2250 (http://www.s-gabriel.org/2250)
    [Mael Ciaran] 1060
    [Gilla Ciaran] 1095
    (O' Corrain & Mavis Cournane, "The Annals of Ulster" (WWW: CELT: Corpus of Electronic Texts: a project of University College, Cork, Ireland, 1997) U1060.5, U1090.5 http://www.ucc.ie/celt/online/G100001/)

    [O'Cathasaigh] --MacLysaght "The Surnames of Ireland" p. 40 s.n. (O) Casey

    Name Commentary

    Talan - > Client will accept major changes wants Irish 5th century.

    He'll need massive changes to turn this into a 5th century name, if it's even possible.

    <Kieran> is an English spelling of <Ciarn>, a spelling compatible with Old Irish, Middle Irish, and Early Modern Irish; <O'Cathasaigh> is a bastardized version of < Cathasaigh>, an Early Modern Irish spelling. But the language of the 5th century was Ogam Irish, also known as Primitive or Archaic Irish, a language very different from any of these. (For terminology and timeline see <http://www.lincolnu.edu/~focal/docs/focaltl.htm>.)

    To get an idea of just how different these very early names are, see 'Some Masculine Ogham Names', by Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn, at <http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/tangwystyl/ogham/>; for instance, Old Irish <Colmn> was Ogam Irish <Colomagnas>, <ogan> was <Ivagenas>, and <Findbarr> was <Vendubaras>.

    For more examples, see St Gabriel reports Nrs. 2886, 2796, and 2537, which discuss Ogam Irish <Mailagnas maqqas Dumnovali>, <Aidagnas maqqas Coilagni>, and <Dubed maqqas Boeda>, corresponding to Old Irish <Meln macc Domnaill>, <edn macc Celin>, and <Dubed macc Boeda>, respectively.

    In some cases the Ogam Irish ancestors of Old Irish names are actually known from inscriptions; in others they can be reconstructed by the methods of historical linguistics. The <-n> of <Ciarn> is from Ogam Irish <-agnas>, the <Cath-> of <Cathassach> is from something like <Catu-> or <Cato->, and I've good reason to think that the Ogam ancestor of <Ciarn> was <Ceragnas> or something very similar, but I've not yet been able to discover the entire etymology of the <-assach> of Old Irish <Cathassach>, without which I can't reconstruct an Ogam Irish predecessor of <Cathassach>. (The <-ach> part is likely from Ogam Irish <-acas>.)

    A further serious problem is that bynames indicating clan membership -- those using the element <> -- were just coming into use in 10th century Ireland and only became popular in the 11th century (Royal Irish Academy, Dictionary of the Irish Language: based mainly on Old and Middle Irish materials (Dublin: Royal Irish Academy, 1983), s.v. <ua>). No such names existed in the 5th century, but there is an attested type that served much the same function of identifying a person with his tribe rather than with his father: Tangwystyl's example (with a typo corrected) is <Dovagnas maqqas mucoi Moddagni> 'Dovagnas son of the tribe of Moddagnas'. Thus, if <Cathassach> went back to an Ogam Irish <Catossacas> (which is probably *not* the case and is used here merely as an illustration!), the nearest 5th century analogue of the submitted name would be something like <Ceragnas maqqas mucoi Catossaci>.

    > (O' Corrain & Mavis Cournane, "The Annals of Ulster" (WWW:CELT: Corpus of Electronic Texts: a project of University College, Cork, Ireland, 1997) U1060.5, U1090.5 http://www.ucc.ie/celt/online/G100001/ )

    The URL should be <http://www.ucc.ie/celt/online/G100001A/>, and the annals are U1060.5 and U1095.5.

    Device Commentary

    Canute - Vert, a pale sable surmounted by an elephant maintaining on it's back a tower argent

    The sable pale on vert violates RfS VIII.2.b.i.

    Return for violating RfS VIII.2.b.i.

    P&T - The sable pale on the vert field is obviously color on color and must be returned. Too bad, the device was striking in its appearance. Hopefully, they will correct the tincture problem and resubmit.

    NAME AND DEVICE RETURNED. CLIENT WILL BE ADVISED OF TALAN’S FINDINGS REGARDING THE NAME.

    9) Konrad Mailander --Badge Resubmission -- Per bend sable and gules, a bear passant bendwise sinister and in dexter chief a mullet of six points Or
    (Curtice, OH)

    BLAZON CHANGE: Per bend gules and sable, in bend, a mullet of six and a bear passant bendwise countourney Or

    His badge "Per bend gules and sable, a bear passant bendwise sinister Or" was returned for conflict. He hopes that the mullet will take it out of conflict.

    Badge Commentary

    P&T- The tinctures of the field are reversed on the blazon. We also think the CoA will see the mullet and the bear as a group of primary charges. Using the top of the bear as the pointer (or, imagine a sword), the bear is actually turned bendwise instead of bendwise sinister. Because the bear is facing the otherway, we could style it as contourney. Therefore, our blazon suggestion is: Per bend gules and sable, in bend, a mullet of six and a bear passant bendwise countourney Or.

    BADGE PASSED TO LAUREL

    10) Robert Fairweather of Eastcote (M) – {New Device - Vert, three seaxes in pale fesswise, points to sinister and edge to chief argent.}
    (Royal Oak, MI)
    (Name reg.'d Jan. '94)

    Device Commentary

    T&P - We would term points to sinister as reversed, and edge to chief as inverted. Our blazon suggestion is: Vert, three seaxes in pale, fesswise reversed inverted argent.

    Canute - Vert, three seaxes in pale fesswise reversed and inverted argent

    Deaton Claymore - September of 1994 (via Atenveldt): Vert, two claymores in saltire surmounted by a third inverted proper.

    Single CD for arrangement.

    Kamrin of the Blackwater - December of 1994 (via Meridies): Vert, in pale between two dragons couchant a sword fesswise reversed argent.

    Single CD for type of over half of primaries.

    Return for multiple conflicts.

    DEVICE RETURNED FOR CONFLICT WITH DEATON CLAYMORE

    11) Zoe Roulaina (F) -- New Name
    (Warren, OH)

    Client will *not* accept any changes.

    [Zoe] -- According to the paperwork: "1025-1261 Byzantine origin.
    PBW SEALS WEBSITE Edition I" (http://kcl.ac.uk/humanities/cch/PBE/seals/start.htm)

    "Early 14th C. Byzantine Names of Macedonia," by Maridonna Benvenuti (http://maridonna.com/onomastics/macedonia)

    [Raoulaina] -- According to the paperwork: "Byzantine-ized form -- Raoul 12th c.
    "aina" - being the feminine form
    (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/byzantine/fem_given_names.html) "

    No photocopies were included.

    Name Commentary

    Talan - > [Zoe] -- According to the paperwork: "1025-1261 Byzantine origin. PBW SEALS WEBSITE Edition I" (http://kcl.ac.uk/humanities/cch/PBE/seals/start.htm)

    Has four instance of <Zoe> in the stated date range. (Note that these are in Greek, and the name is really <Z>, zeta omega eta.

    > "Early 14th C. Byzantine Names of Macedonia," by Maridonna Benvenuti (http://maridonna.com/onomastics/macedonia)

    Another instance of <Zoe>.

    > [Raoulaina] -- According to the paperwork: "Byzantine-ized form -- Raoul 12th c. "aina" - being the feminine form (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/byzantine/fem_given_names.html)

    This URL has <Zoe> 1062 but offers no support for <Raoulaina>. Probably the page on 'Feminizing Family Names'

    At <http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/byzantine/feminizing.html#feminizing_family_names> was intended, which says that as a byname, the borrowed Old French name <Raoul> was feminized as <Raoulaina>. (It actually refers to <Raoul> as a Frankish name, but this is incorrect.) Finally, the table at <http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/byzantine/family_names.html#family_names> does in fact show <Raoul> as a 12th century family name. It should be noted, however, that this is a normalized spelling; the Old French name is actually found as <Raol> and <Raul> in 12th century documents from England. It's quite possible, however, that in Greek the name might have been written rho-alpha-omicron-upsilon-lambda, which would be transliterated <Raoul>; if so, <Raoulaina> is a reasonable transliteration of the corresponding Greek feminine surname. <Z Raoulaina> appears to be a transliteration of a possible 12th century Byzantine Greek name.

    NAME CHANGED TO <Z Raoulaina> AND PASSED TO LAUREL. CLIENT DID NOT CHECK BOXES NOT ALLOWING CHANGE, SHE JUST MADE A NOTE ASKING TO BE NOTIFIED OF CHANGES. THE ONLY CHANGE THAT WAS MADE WAS THE ADDITION OF THE ACCENTS. CLIENT HAS BEEN NOTIFIED OF THE CHANGE.

     


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    Lady Phebe Bonadeci

    Rouge Scarpe Herald