October 23rd, 2011

Greetings unto all who read these words from Meister Konrad Mailander, Rouge Scarpe Herald,

This is the Middle Kingdom Letter of Acceptances and Returns for the items on the August 26th, 2011 ILoI.

My thanks to Aryanhwy merch Catmael and Talan Gwynek for their commentary.   I have copied relevant passages from the commentary.  

My decision and comments on them follow the commentary and are prefaced with ROUGE SCARPE: and are in red.  Items that are accepted will be forwarded to Laurel as a Middle LoI posted on OSCAR.  


1)  Beatrice Bella Cantante (F) – New Name

Rimsholt

Beatrice -
Appears in the online Castato of Florence, 1427, as cited at http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/arval/catasto under both Beatrice and Beatrix.

Bella Cantante -
intended as a descriptive byname ("beautiful singer") which would be idiomatic Italian for "sings beautifully." "Bellavocce" (Beautiful voice) would also be acceptable.

Escutcheon's Note:
Client will accept major and minor changes, and cares most about meaning, and asks the name be corrected to be "idiomatic of 14th-15th C. Firenze (Florence) Italian dialect."

Name Comments:

Aryanhwy:  I would be surprised if a two word byname like <Bella Cantante> would be an appropriate construction in Italian. However, while I keep looking for support, I note that the article cited for <Beatrice> also has <Bella>, and double given names are registerable in Italian, so that leaves us with just needing to find documentation for <Cantante> or the like.

All right, here's a start. Minervini, Dizionario dei Cognomi Pugliesi s.n. Cantatore says:

Poco diffuso nel resto d'Italia, e frequente sopratutto in Puglia nella forma base (spec. nel Barese e nel Foggiano) e meno nel patronimic <Lo Cantore>, deriva dal soprannome <Cantatore> (<lat. <cantator>) 'cantore' e puo essere anche la forma aferetiva di <incantore> 'affascinante, seducente'. Tale nome, divenuto poi cognome, potrebbe essere stato dato ad un 'bambino affascinante e bellisimo, attrazione di chi gli stava accanto'. La variante <Lo Cantore> e formato dell'art. <Lo> + <cantore>, forma sincopata di <Cantatore>, di cui e un patronimico. E attestato in docc. mediev. pugl.: <Cantatorus Angelus> (CDP 19.2); in Puglia e molto frequente a Molfetta sin dal 1810: <Cantatore Angelo>.

Which essentially means:

Not widespread in the rest of Italy, and especially common in Apulia in the basic form (esp. in Bari and Foggia) and less in the variant <Lo Cantore>, comes from the nickname <Cantatore> (<lat. <cantator>) 'singer' and can also be of the afferative form <incantore>' fascinating and seductive'. This name, which later became the surname may have been given to a 'fascinating and beautifull child, attracting those who stood beside him'. The variant form <Lo Cantore> is the art. <lo + <cantore>, a syncopated form of <Cantatore>. And attested in medieval documents from Puglia.: <Cantatorus Angelus> (CDP 19.2), and very frequently in Puglia since 1810 in Molfetta: <Cantatore Angelo>.
<Cantatorus> is a Latinized form, with <Cantatore> being the expected vernacular. Even though the citation of <Cantatorus> isn't explicitly dated, it should be sufficient to give <Cantatore> the benefit of the doubt.

ROUGE SCARPE:  Forwarded to Laurel as <Beatrice Bella Cantatore>.  No documentation was give for <Bella Cantante> and none could be found.  Commentary did point out that <Bella> could be found as a given name in the same article as <Beatrice> and double given names are registerable in Italian and did make a case for <Cantatore> being a plausible name of the intended meaning and since the submitter allows changes it the name has been changed to match the documentation found.  


2) Pierre de Montereau (M) – New Badge - "Vert, a dolphin naiant to sinister and a base urdy argent charged with a rose gules within a circular strip argent inscribed with the motto sable and secured in base with a fetterlock sable "

Starleaf Gate

Escutcheon's Note:
Client's name was registered in March of 2004 via the middle.

Badge Comments:

Aryanhwy:  As was noted on MK-Heralds, the motto needs to be spelled out in full in the blazon. Also, a translation needs to be provided, so that we can check that it is not offensive/presumptuous/etc.

The design of the badge is problematic because the circular strip (not a recognized heraldic charge so far as I can tell) with the fetterlock is awfully close to the belt that Scottish clan chiefs used to enscribe their badges. Quoted on the 09/2004 LoAR:

[Returning Or, a gurges purpure within a belt sable] Armory using a charge within a belt strap is restricted as such motifs were used as a standard form of badge display in Scottish armory. [Dec 2000, Ret-Meridies, Pol MacNeill]
I don't believe that charging the strip with a motto helps the presumption at all

ROUGE SCARPE: Returned.  This badge has several problems.  A translation of the motto needs to be provided.  Also the words used must be shown to be period and no documentation was provided.  This was the primary cause of return at Kingdom.

Precedent:   [(Fieldless) A Maltese cross gules within and conjoined to an annulet sable charged with the words "Antiquity Camaradery Generosity" argent] Words that are used in armory must be period. As the earliest date that could be found for "Camaradery" in any spelling is late 17th century, this word is not allowable on armory barring evidence of its use in period. [Leifr Hrólfsson and Lucia de la Valette, 04/04, A-Drachenwald]

Further the "circular strip" looks a lot like the belt strap that Scottish clan chiefs used around their badges.  

[Argent, a fox's mask azure within a belt sable.] The combination of a charge within a belt or strap is listed in the Glossary of Terms under "Restricted Charges" in accordance with the following precedent:

[Returning Or, a gurges purpure within a belt sable] Armory using a charge within a belt strap is restricted as such motifs were used as a standard form of badge display in Scottish armory. [Dec 2000, Ret-Meridies, Pol MacNeill]

RfS XI.1 states: "Armory that contains elements reserved to or required of certain ranks, positions, or territorial entities, inside or outside the Society, is considered presumptuous." This is such a use, and must therefore be returned for violation of that rule. [Malcolm McGregor the Bold, LoAR 09/2004, Atenveldt-R]

As it would be a judgment call I would not have returned it in Kingdom for this reason alone, but it likely would have been at Laurel level.  

I would reblazon the badge:  [Fieldless] A circular strip argent inscribed with "text of the motto" and secured in base with a fetterlock sable around a roundel vert charged with a dolphin naiant to sinister and a base urdy argent charged with a rose gules.  A circular strip is not a recognized heraldic charge which could also be problematic.  The submitter should know that although for a long time the badge form had a roundel, a badge has no set shape.  Since the current forms have a square shape for a badge the emblazon should use to whole space unless it is fieldless.    


3) Tomasso Francesco (M) – New Name and Device- "Azure, a llama statant to sinister argent"

Rimsholt

Tomasso -
Italian equivalent of Thomas as given by St. Gabriel referencing this source:
http://www.stg.brown.edu/projects/tratte/doc/TLNAME1.html

Francesco -
Locative byname for "The Frenchman" in the manner of Giovanni di Bernardon (1181), who was called "Francesco" by his father:
http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/216793/Saint-Francis-of-Assis

Escutcheon's Note: Client will accept major and minor changes, cares most about language/culture (Italian), and requests it be changed to be authentic for 14th century Northern or Central Italy. Client notes the intended meaning is "Tom from France"

Client provided additional documentation indicating that llamas are not a period charge but giving several SCA precedents for them, the most recent dating to 2009, and also indicating that knowledge of llamas was period.

Name Comments:

Aryanhwy:  <Tomasso> is not found in the cited document, rather, the spelling <Tommaso> is. (It occurs 3522 times in the data set).

<Francesco> is a given name, not a byname, though it does derivatively mean 'French'. If he wants the family name form, it is <Franceschi>, found 8 times in Juliana de Luna's "Names in 15th Century Florence and her Dominions: the Condado" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/condado /), which also has 72 examples of <Tommaso>. <Tommaso Franceschi> is a great 15th C central Italian name; for the 14th C, my "Italian Given Names from the Online Tratte of Office Holders 1282-1532" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/italian/tratte /) provides some data. There are numerous 14th C examples of both <Tommaso> and <Francesco>, but no family name derived from the latter. With this data, the most authentic form would be to make <Francesco> a literal patronymic, <Tommaso di Francesco>, but this would mean 'Thomas son of Frnacis', not 'Thomas the Frenchman'.

I found no conflicts with either form.

Konrad:  The "Names in 15th Century Florence and her Dominions: the Condado" article cited by Aryanhwy also has <del Francia> occuring 4 times with the description "possibly patronym or locative "France"."

Device Comments:

Aryanhwy:  The arms likely conflict with Suleiman ibn al-Khattaru (reg. 02/1998 via Caid), "(Fieldless) A camel statant to sinister argent," with a CD for the field, but no other. Given that llamas are not period charges, and they are visually similar to camels, I would be surprised if there were a CD for type.

ROUGE SCARPE:  Name forwarded to Laurel as <Tommaso del Francia>.  The given name has been changed to match the spelling given in the documentation and the byname has been changed to better match the submitters intended meaning.  The given byname <Francesco> is also a given name.  The submitter should know that <Tommaso di Francesco> which is closer to what has been submitted and would be a registerable 14th Century Italian name meaning "Thomas son of Francis", if they would prefer this they should contact Rouge Scarpe ASAP so that their preference can be put into commentary at Laurel level before the end of December.  

Device Forwarded to Laurel with the Blazon:  Azure, a llama statant to sinister argent.  The submitter should be aware that this quite possibly conflicts with Suleiman ibn al-Khattaru (reg. 02/1998 via Caid), "(Fieldless) A camel statant to sinister argent."  There is one CD for the field but it is unsure whether there would be a second for type between a camel and a llama since camels and llamas look similar and a llama is not a period charge.  But since there is some chance that it might be ruled there is a CD between them it is being sent on. 


In Service to Crown and College,

Meister Konrad Mailander, OP

Rouge Scarpe:

Konrad Mailander
Dale Niederhauser
110 Dodge St.
Swanton, OH 43558
rougescarpe@midrealm.org